What if I miss something? Homeschool Worries

Yesterday I shared my curriculum plans for our first year of homeschooling. I love how supportive and curious most people are about homeschooling. Yes, there are still people who don’t believe in this process of education, but they are often very behind in their understanding of what home education looks like in 2015 and usually with a fairly brief conversation I am able to open their eyes to this new world of educational opportunities.

From the detractors and the curious, one of the most common questions I get is: What if you miss part of the curriculum? What if you miss something important you were supposed to teach them?

Homeschool worries - What if I screw this up?

It’s an interesting question because it taps into one of the biggest fears parents have when they start homeschooling or are considering it as an option. Essentially the fear is: What if I screw this up? What if I screw up my kids?

Well, here’s the thing, you really can’t screw this up. Even kids in the school system have skill gaps. Things happen that cause kids to miss out on certain lessons. The inevitability of skill gaps is something we need to learn to accept. Everyone has them, we simply can’t know everything. Even if our name is Sheldon.  🙂

But here’s the thing, if you have a passion for learning and an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, you will happily fill those gaps and learn what you need to learn.

Einstein said: Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think.

Learning is not something that happens only in a classroom. As an adult I have continued to learn. I’ve studied math so I can understand and manage my finances. I’ve taken courses and lessons from professionals on child development and special needs so I can be a better mother to my children. When I developed health issues I studied biology and medical terminology so I could communicate with the specialists and understand their responses.

Learning should never stop and it is definitely not something that happens only in a classroom. In fact, I would bet that for most people the majority of their most important education and retention of information, never happened in a classroom.

If I need to pick up a new skill I know how to search, find answers and teach myself.

In today’s day and age, where the world’s knowledge can be had from a device that fits in my pocket, it’s no longer about who knows the most (sorry Sheldon!), but about who can filter all the information available to find what they need to know, when they need it.

In our homeschool we are learning all the usual stuff, but the most important thing I am teaching my children is to have a passion for knowledge and a love for learning. I want them to have the drive and adaptability to take information and process it effectively. I want to raise children who can think critically and problem solve.

As long as we achieve that, we have missed nothing and achieved so much.

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